(Cloud) Tip Of The Day

This tip of the day is cloud yo!  Straight from Evan Basalik, an Senior Support Escalation Engineer!

Today’s (Cloud) Tip…Security of customer data in Office 365

We employ all of the follow methods to secure customer data in Office 365:

1) Network segmentation to ensure physical separate of back-end services and devices from public-facing interfaces

2) BitLocker 256-bit AES Encryption for all email content at rest (i.e., on storage media)

3) Access to physical hardware is monitored and controlled by including badges and smart cards, biometric scanners, on-premises security officers, continuous video surveillance, and two-factor authentication

4) Our racks are seismically braced (I just think that is cool!)

5) Traffic Throttling to Prevent Denial of Service Attacks

6) Deleting unnecessary accounts automatically when an employee leaves, changes groups, or does not use the account prior to its expiration

The service is also certified by a number of independent compliance checks and validations such as:

1) ISO 27001

2) FISMA moderate Authority to Operate

3) HIPAA Business Association Agreement (BAA)

4) EU Model Clauses

5) Cloud Security Alliance (https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/research/projects/cloud-controls-matrix-ccm/)

See http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=26552 for all the details.

How to stand up a MediaWiki on Windows Server 2012 (10 easy steps with pictures)

Step 1.  Setup Windows Server 2012 (see my build a lab series for that if you don’t know how).

Step 2.  Patch it and name it blah blah.

Step 3.  Download Microsoft Web Platform 4.5:

http://www.bing.com/search?setmkt=en-US&q=microsoft+web+platform+4.5

Step 4.  Run it.

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Step 5.  Click Database, then “MySQL Windows 5.1” and click “Add”

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Step 6.  Click “Applications” and Select “Wiki on the left to sort it, then click “MediaWiki” and click “Add”.

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Step 7.  Click “Install” and let ‘er rip!

Step 8.  Configure Password to a strong password.

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Step 8.  Click Continue and then Check the box, help the people who write code to get feedback on their installers, and hit “I Accept” (or don’t, that’s cool too, you still need to hit “I Accept, but you don’t need to check the box).

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Step 9.  Grab a drink and wait:

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Filling in a pw here (pretty sure this should match what we put above, if not I’ll change it later):

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Whee

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After clicking finish it opens an IE 10 window to local host.  It looks like there was a bug where there were // instead of / after ‘localhost’ so I removed one and hit enter.  Then I got prompted to turn on “Intranet Security” as it was currently disabled on my 2012 Server (action bar at the bottom of the browser window).  After I did that I got this:

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Step 10.  Do wiki stuff!  Share and enjoy!

-The Dude

Building up a learning lab based on Windows 8 and Hyper-V, Part VI

So in our previous installment, we were at Server Manager, ready to configure our pristine Domain Controller.  So lets get to it!

First, click on “Local Server” on the left pane.

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What do we notice in the image below?  Computer name is goofy so lets fix it.

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Clik the hyperlink for the machine name, which brings up this interface below:

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Clicking ok at that point rewards you with a reboot notice, click ok, then click ok again and restart.

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So now when we logon again and select Local Server in Server Admin we get this view:

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So lets shift to the right and address some housekeeping items, by the way in your lab, probably ok to ignore this:

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At least for now…

So in a LAB environment where I might be web browsing from a server to collect software to install, I turn off IE ESC:

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and then maybe I turn on Automatic Windows Updates (depends on if I am testing updates or not…

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And apply some updates.  I do this before I enable the AD role, out of habit…

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Install those patches and let it reboot.

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So let it reboot, hit restart now.

Building up a learning lab based on Windows 8 and Hyper-V, Part V, the triumphant return

When we last left our “how to build a Hyper-V based lab” blog post, which is here by the way, we were building our Domain Controller.  So here’s what it looks like as it goes through setup:

 

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Progressing nicely, yay!

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Woot, 100%!

 

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Almost there!

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Rock on!

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And it is done, sort of…

 

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So here we are with Windows Server 2012 identifying its running in a Hyper-V VM, readying its’ Integration Components that come with the base Windows media.

 

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It restarts and continues…

 

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Here we need to give it an Administrator password.  I made it Password1.  You can of course make it something else (and probably should in fact).  This will transition to the domain admin password in a bit.

 

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After that it setups up the security database…

 

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Lo and behold, we are now ready to logon to the system as our Administrator ID.

 

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The time is wrong though, any thoughts on why?  Here’s my system tray:

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Correct, it expected Pacific Standard Time of course, and the dude is east coast.

To logon click the three key icon on your Hyper-V taskbar (the far left icon):

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So after clicking the 3 button icon (Protip:  You can also click CTRL+ALT+END to do the same thing):

 

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Building our profile looks like this:

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Now we get a desktop and Server Manager fires up for our 1st configuration requests:

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On to the next blog on configuring a Domain Controller for a forest and domain root!

Windows 8 Tip of the Day: How to map a drive in Windows to a Skydrive folder or root.

1) Open a document in SkyDrive – such as an excel xls or word doc

2) File->Save As (Note folder – it will be something like https://d.docs.live.net/{your-id}/Documents

3) In Windows Explorer, click Map Network Drive and enter path

Note: I use https://d.docs.live.net/{your –id} as I have other files at one level higher than Documents.

 

Thanks to Tom Archer for this tidbit!